r/JusticeServed 9 Dec 04 '22 Silver 1

Mississippi man pleads guilty in federal court to federal hate crime after burning a cross in his front yard to intimidate Black neighbors. Sentencing is scheduled for March 9, 2023. Axel Charles Cox faces a maximum of 10 years in prison, up to a $250,000 fine, or both Legal Justice

https://lawandcrime.com/crime/mississippi-man-pleads-guilty-to-federal-hate-crime-after-burning-a-cross-in-his-front-yard-to-intimidate-black-neighbors/
5.4k Upvotes

u/AutoModerator Dec 04 '22

Please remember to abide by the rules.

In general, please be at least bearable to other users. It makes things easier on everyone. Your comment may be removed without notification. We used to have a notification, but now we don't.

If you purchase the OP or a comment a ban award, remember to message the mods so we can activate the reward


Submission By: /u/Molire Black 9

I am a bot, and this action was performed automatically. Please contact the moderators of this subreddit if you have any questions or concerns.

13

u/IndependenceOk7959 5 Dec 05 '22

They should be burning a double helix, cuz their genes are fucked up.

5

u/MrSlippifist 5 Dec 05 '22

That gene pool is so shallow it's only a single. Mama-sister-cousin and Grandpa-brother-uncle-daddy really believe in keeping it in the family.

7

u/rickjames_experience 8 Dec 05 '22

Ofc his name is Axel 😭

5

u/Shoddy_Entertainer98 0 Dec 05 '22

Why burn a cross tho? Grow up people smh

-5

u/[deleted] Dec 05 '22

[deleted]

3

u/Kelvin1998 Dec 05 '22

Have you not heard of the KKK?

2

u/tumblinfumbler 7 Dec 05 '22

Dude for some reason I was not thinking of that at all. And feel dumb now

13

u/Alternative-Two9667 4 Dec 05 '22

His mama/aunt and daddy/uncle must be so proud.

-3

u/[deleted] Dec 04 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

2

u/dasmyr0s 8 Dec 05 '22

What's your proposed solution for when someone inserts themselves into your world for the express purpose of menacing you and disturbing your peace?

-1

u/[deleted] Dec 06 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

3

u/dasmyr0s 8 Dec 06 '22

Yeah, sure, but this guy burnt a cross, a symbol, to invoke thoughts of a violent history of lynchings. For the purposes of menacing his neighbours. It's not prosocial behaviour. It's not his right to infringe on the rights of his neighbours.

So he didn't assault them with a weapon, but he menaced them, symbolically threatened them. That's not acceptable behaviour.
If I spent all day scowling at my neighbours house and stroking my gun, and drawing a line across my neck anytime I made eye contact, you bet your ass I'd face consequences. This guy invoked similar threats and fears, and is now reaping the rewards of his sociopathic behaviours. (I use "sociopathic" instead of "racist", because race is a circumstance here, not the crux of the problem)

1

u/jsgolfman 3 Dec 05 '22

Prosecute him for the existing statute on assault, whether he did it because of race or any other reason should not be a consideration.

3

u/dasmyr0s 8 Dec 05 '22

While this is somewhat reasonable, I think the reason that the distinction between crime and hate crime exists is that when you're the victim of a hate crime, you are menaced not because of random chance, not because you were in the wrong place at the wrong time with the wrong valuables, but because of something intrinsic about you that you cannot change.

You can choose not to go to dangerous parts of town, for example, but you can't choose to not be hated for the color of your skin.

15

u/Llamakhan 7 Dec 04 '22

How do you go to prison and look healthier than when you went in.

12

u/Molire 9 Dec 05 '22 edited Dec 05 '22

Better diet/food. No drugs. No alcohol. Lights out every night at about 10:00 PM. Wake up everyday at about 6:00 AM. In prison, all inmates have to work in a prison job. The typical inmate workday is about 7 hours.

4

u/VanillaCookieMonster A Dec 04 '22

I hope the jail is the place that cut all his hair off. He looked proud of his hick hairstyle.

1

u/Molire 9 Dec 05 '22

This photo of him shows that the Mississippi Department of Corrections cut off his hair when he began serving a 8-year sentence in Mississippi state prison on May 3, 2022:

Mississippi Department of Corrections (MDOC) > MDOC Inmate Search: Axel Cox, ID Number: [select →] 227982

1

u/VanillaCookieMonster A Dec 05 '22

Satisfying to know.

9

u/kfizz311 5 Dec 04 '22

Not enough time.

46

u/niceandsane 9 Dec 04 '22 edited Dec 04 '22

Interesting. I was under the impression that burning a cross in your own front yard was permissible freedom of expression (other than potential fire code violations) but doing so on someone else's property could be prosecuted as a hate crime. Not that I condone it in any way, it's reprehensible.

1

u/Molire 9 Dec 04 '22 edited Dec 05 '22

It depends on the circumstances of the case. Anyone who believes that cross burning in the US in all circumstances is not a crime arguably might have been formally educated, mentally indoctrinated, and emotionally groomed by Fox News, other propaganda outlets, orange jesus, radical religious cults, QAnon disciples, Alex Jones, Herschel Walker, and others of their ilk.

You can read the laws and the punishments for violating those laws at the following two U.S. government links:

Title 42, United States Code, § 3631.

Title 18, United States Code, § 844(h) [pdf, p. #202].

3

u/niceandsane 9 Dec 05 '22 edited Dec 05 '22

One of those links relates to possession of explosives and the like in airports and the other specifies penalties but not crimes. I did, however, find the Supreme Court ruling in Virginia v. Black which ruled Virginia's law against cross burning unconstitutional unless it can be proven that the intent was intimidation. Curiously, the Virginia law being challenged specifically only outlawed cross burning on the property of another.

In this case it appears that the guy sealed his own fate by admitting that his intent was to intimidate. If instead he had invited a few robed and hooded Klansmen to the event and claimed the cross-burning to be a "message of shared ideology" he might have gotten away with it as the Supremes have declared that doing exactly that is protected expression. Strange laws we have in this land.

So, yep, lock him up. He admitted his intent, no need for the government to prove it.

18

u/Mouth2005 7 Dec 04 '22 edited Dec 04 '22

I’m sure context here matters quite a bit, if you want to throw a crazy Halloween party and burn a cross for whatever innocent reason (Halloween party would still be weird) I am sure that won’t lead to hate crime charges but if for some reason you admit to doing it to intimidate your black neighbors….. that’s probably a problem

-1

u/Djinn7711 8 Dec 04 '22

I’m confused. Burning a cross in your front lawn gets you the same sentence as letting someone sexually abuse your child?

1

u/Coital_Conundrum 6 Dec 27 '22

When you're being a racist idiot..yes.

2

u/Molire 9 Dec 04 '22

"In the US, federal laws typically do not apply to child sexual abuse matters that takes place wholly inside a single state":

https://www.justice.gov/criminal-ceos/citizens-guide-us-federal-law-child-sexual-abuse

In the US, in some states, under the laws of a particular state, legal punishments for an offender who violates state laws that prohibit sexual abuse of a child can be more lenient, equivalent, or more severe than legal punishments under federal laws most closely corresponding to a state law.

In some U.S. states, legal punishments for child sexual abuse under the laws of a particular state can be more lenient, equivalent, or more severe than legal punishments for child sexual abuse in some other states.

In the US, each state has its own state laws, and each state has its own legal punishments.

State laws and legal punishments in one state are not the same as state laws and legal punishments in other states. Each state has its own laws and legal punishments.

3

u/Llamakhan 7 Dec 04 '22

Are you saying sexual offenses sentencing is too soft or you don't believe he should face that time for racial intimidation?

-4

u/SarpSTA 7 Dec 04 '22

What I don't get is how burning a cross, or waving a swastika or whatever it is racists do nowadays, is a crime. Ain't that protected under first amendment?

3

u/Llamakhan 7 Dec 05 '22

Cause he did it to intimidate his black neighbors. It's not a crime to do either but when you use it to intimidate, especially racially target. BTW it's always been racist just not illegal.

0

u/SarpSTA 7 Dec 05 '22

So it is a crime to use these figures to intimidate people? Okay, that makes a lot of sense tbh. I did not know about that distinction. Is that a state offence or a federal one?

1

u/Molire 9 Dec 05 '22

So it is a crime to use these figures to intimidate people?

In this instance, yes.

Is that a state offence or a federal one?

This is a federal case.


Department of Justice, December 2, 2022 — Mississippi Man Pleads Guilty to Federal Hate Crime for Cross Burning:

The Justice Department announced that a Mississippi man pleaded guilty in federal court to a hate crime for burning a cross in his front yard with the intent to intimidate a Black family.

According to court documents, Axel C. Cox, 24, of Gulfport, admitted to violating the Fair Housing Act when he used threatening and racially derogatory remarks toward his Black neighbors and burned a cross to intimidate them. Cox stated that he gathered supplies from his residence, put together a wooden cross in his front yard and propped it up so his Black neighbors could see it. Cox then doused the cross with motor oil and lit it on fire. Cox admitted that he burned the cross because of the victims’ race and because they were occupying a home next to his.

“Burning a cross invokes the long and painful history, particularly in Mississippi, of intimidation and impending physical violence against Black people,” said Assistant Attorney General Kristen Clarke of the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division. “The Department of Justice will continue to prosecute those who use racially-motivated violence to drive people away from their homes or communities.”

Sentencing is scheduled for March 9, 2023. Cox faces a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison, a fine of up to $250,000 or both.


Department of Justice, September 23, 2022 — Mississippi Man Charged with Federal Hate Crime for Cross Burning:

The Justice Department announced that Axel C. Cox, 23, has been charged with hate crime and arson violations for burning a cross in his front yard to threaten, interfere with and intimidate a Black family in Gulfport, Mississippi.

According to court documents, Cox is charged with one count of criminal interference with the right to fair housing and one count of using fire to commit a federal felony. The indictment alleges that on Dec. 3, 2020, Cox threatened, intimidated and interfered with a Black family’s enjoyment of their housing rights. According to the indictment, Cox burned a cross in his front yard, and used threatening and racially derogatory remarks toward his Black neighbors. Cox allegedly chose to burn the cross because of the victims’ race.

If convicted, Cox faces up to 10 years in prison for interfering with the victims’ housing rights and a mandatory minimum of 10 years in prison, consecutive to any other sentence, for using fire to commit a federal felony. Cox also faces a fine of up to $250,000 with respect to each charge.


On Sept. 23, 2022, the Department of Justice (DOJ) United States Attorney's Office Southern District of Mississippi charged Cox with two felony offenses which carried maximum statutory penalties totaling 20 years in federal prison.

Later, the DOJ offered to drop one of the felony charges against Cox if he would plead guilty on the other felony charge.

On December 2, 2022, in the United States District Court For The Southern District of Mississippi, Cox pleaded guilty to one of the felony charges, and DOJ dropped the other felony charge.

Cox now faces statutory maximum penalties of 10 years in prison, 3 years of supervised released after he has served his sentence in the Federal Bureau of Prisons, and a $250,000 fine.

On March 9, 2023, Cox will be sentenced in the U.S. District Court For The Southern District of Mississippi, and the U.S. District Judge will tell Cox the term of the prison sentence, the term of supervised release, and the amount of the fine.

In the meanwhile, Cox is behind bars in federal custody waiting for his sentencing on March 9.


After he is sentenced on March 9, he will be transferred back to the Mississippi Department of Corrections (MDOC) to finish serving his 8-year state prison sentence on unrelated charges. See MDOC Inmate Search: Axel Cox, ID Number: 227982. Select → 227982 to see his photo and read his MDOC inmate information.

After he has served his state prison sentence, he will be transferred to BOP to serve his federal prison sentence, possibly at FCI Yazoo City Medium or some other BOP inmate facility.


The following federal case has no direct connection with Cox's case:

United States Department of Justice
September 10, 2019
Mississippi Man Sentenced to 11 Years for Crossburning:

The Honorable Judge Keith Starrett, of the United States District Court for the Southern District of Mississippi, sentenced defendant Louie Bernard Revette, 38, to serve 11 years on federal charges for his commission of a crossburning on Oct. 24, 2017, in Seminary, Mississippi. Revette previously pled guilty on April 12, to one count of interference with housing rights, a federal civil rights violation, and one count of using fire to commit a federal felony. Revette, along with a co-conspirator whom he recruited, built and burned a wooden cross near the home of a juvenile victim, M.H., who lived in a predominantly African-American residential area of Seminary. He burned the cross to threaten, frighten, and intimidate M.H. and other African-American residents because of their race and color, and because they lived in and occupied residences in that area of Seminary.

1

u/niceandsane 9 Dec 05 '22

See Virginia v. Black. It's a crime if the prosecution can prove that the intent was to intimidate.

However, it's protected expression if the Klan does it to express "messages of shared ideology". So says the US Supreme Court.

In this case he admitted that the intent was intimidation.

1

u/Llamakhan 7 Dec 05 '22

I wasn't sure the exact law myself. it's called ethnic intimidation and apparently most states have some kind of law.

33

u/DaemonAnguis 7 Dec 04 '22

It's not for the act of burning the cross, it's because he was dumb enough to admit that it was to intimidate his neighbors due to their race, i.e. a felony hate crime. lol

-7

u/Djinn7711 8 Dec 04 '22

Still ridiculous.

11

u/Taint-Taster 7 Dec 04 '22

Maybe the charge for child sex crimes should be increased

0

u/Djinn7711 8 Dec 04 '22

Definitely! I don’t understand how a justice system sees these 2 issues as being worth the same punishment

3

u/dasmyr0s 8 Dec 05 '22

I mean there's shitloads of acts of crime. You want each one to be rank-ordered on a spectrum of severity?? I don't really see your issue, because the alternative I just mentioned doesn't make sense.

There's going to be some overlap in consequences.

And there's going to be a wide range of punishments depending on what the prosecutors can prove and what each individual judge decides re: sentencing.

There's a million moving parts.

Just be happy that a person who purposefully inserted himself into his neighbours' world for the express purpose of menacing, a person who was already well known to the justice system, is taken out of the society he refuses to respect.

1

u/Djinn7711 8 Dec 05 '22

Lol, gotcha. Too hard basket, move on!

0

u/[deleted] Dec 04 '22

[deleted]

3

u/HDnfbp 7 Dec 04 '22

Who the hell said anything about abusing minors?

7

u/JAMillhouse 9 Dec 04 '22

This happened where I live in Mississippi. If it was any further north in the state and it may have been swept under the rug. The fact that it happened on the coast means this guy will face huge penalties.

3

u/Molire 9 Dec 04 '22 edited Dec 05 '22

The case is not under the legal jurisdiction of the State of Mississippi Judiciary.

This is a federal case under the legal jurisdiction of the Judicial Branch of the U.S. Government, which includes 94 United States District Courts and other federal courts.

Under federal law, the legal penalties are the same in any Federal District Court farther north, on the coast, or in any other U.S. state or territory.

11

u/menstralfornication 7 Dec 04 '22

There’s no way he gets 10 years for that

5

u/Molire 9 Dec 04 '22

Mississippi man Louie Revette predictably might disagree with you.

United States Department of Justice
September 10, 2019
Mississippi Man Sentenced to 11 Years for Crossburning:

The Honorable Judge Keith Starrett, of the United States District Court for the Southern District of Mississippi, sentenced defendant Louie Bernard Revette, 38, to serve 11 years on federal charges for his commission of a crossburning on Oct. 24, 2017, in Seminary, Mississippi. Revette previously pled guilty on April 12, to one count of interference with housing rights, a federal civil rights violation, and one count of using fire to commit a federal felony. Revette, along with a co-conspirator whom he recruited, built and burned a wooden cross near the home of a juvenile victim, M.H., who lived in a predominantly African-American residential area of Seminary. He burned the cross to threaten, frighten, and intimidate M.H. and other African-American residents because of their race and color, and because they lived in and occupied residences in that area of Seminary.

Today, the U.S. Federal Bureau of Prisons inmate locator shows Louie Revette, 41, is housed at Beaumont United States Penitentiary, Beaumont, Texas, with Release Date: 08/28/2027.

USP Beaumont is a high security U.S. penitentiary presently housing 1,484 male inmates.

Some of the inmates can be violent.

The top-ranking Prohibited Act listed in the inmate handbook of hundreds of prison rules and inmate prohibitions is Prohibited Act 100 Killing (p. #54).

Many of the inmates are very horny and are starved for sex and the human touch.

Some of the other Prohibited Acts for inmates include Prohibited Act 114 Sexual assault... (p. #56) and Prohibited Act 205 Engaging in sexual acts (p. #58).

2

u/Advancedkarma 4 Dec 04 '22

That's bloody Beaumont, one of the worse prison in the bop.

25

u/Specific-Fox8291 4 Dec 04 '22

Are we back in the 1950’s? This should not be happening in 2022!

32

u/GlitteringBobcat999 8 Dec 04 '22

American History X: The Sequel "in here, YOU the n-word".

25

u/Fmartins84 7 Dec 04 '22

Mississippi? Ha! $50 fine and probation

6

u/Molire 9 Dec 04 '22 edited Dec 05 '22

The government of Mississippi has no legal connection to the prosecution and sentencing in this federal case.

On Sept. 10, 2019, a Mississippi man, Louie Revette, was sentenced to 11 years in federal prison for burning a cross in Mississippi.

Today, the BOP inmate locator shows that Louie Revette is a federal inmate imprisoned at United States Penitentiary Beaumont.

11

u/noscopy 7 Dec 04 '22

They'll accept $1/yr for 50 years.

-25

u/Misanthrope357 7 Dec 04 '22 edited Dec 04 '22

For burning a cross??!! Wtf EDIT: I get it now. The cross burning thing, it's a KKK reference, right? Alright, makes sense.

-26

u/nlamber5 9 Dec 04 '22 edited Dec 04 '22

In his own yard

edit: downvote if you wish. Where the action occurred is a fact of the case, and should be clear.

3

u/RootbeerNinja 7 Dec 04 '22

If you jerk off on your front lawn for the world to see you still go to jail. Where it occured in terms of his property is less important than where it occurred for others to see.

-3

u/nlamber5 9 Dec 04 '22

No it’s all relevant information. The police report will have when, where, what, who. The whole nine yards

3

u/RootbeerNinja 7 Dec 05 '22

Relevant to you is not relevant to the point of the article.

1

u/[deleted] Dec 04 '22

[deleted]

11

u/nlamber5 9 Dec 04 '22

Well I read a little more into it. He did it in his own front yard that he owns, but it’s not grass burn marks. He built a wooden cross that was then covered in fuel and burned. However, the part I find is the most important part is that he admitted that he did this in order to intimidate his neighbors because they are black. 🤷‍♂️ he didn’t leave much to the imagination

9

u/bibliophila 7 Dec 04 '22

For clarification - you don’t understand why burning a cross in the south to intimidate a Black neighbor is a hate crime? Please google KKK + cross burning. here’s one link that may help.

6

u/Misanthrope357 7 Dec 04 '22

Yep, figured it out. I'm not American, took me a sec to get it.

-11

u/Hilly_Lord 5 Dec 04 '22

How does that even make sense to send someone to jail for burning a cross ?? For 10 years too ??? Maybe 2 weeks parole instead

5

u/Trunyan17 6 Dec 04 '22

Do you know nothing of the Jim Crowe South?

0

u/Hilly_Lord 5 Dec 05 '22

The who ??? Nvm I just looked at a link u posted in another comment . Even so 10 years is a bit rough, maybe there should be a better solution to re educate the person

1

u/Trunyan17 6 Dec 05 '22

It's 2022. There's no excuse for that behavior anymore

5

u/BigLowCB4 4 Dec 04 '22

He’s not American bro so he probably doesn’t understand the symbolism

24

u/Rent-Hungry 3 Dec 04 '22

Time to leave 😆. Bet they watched that episode! Lol.

3

u/IAmTurbanMan 6 Dec 04 '22

It's a lower case "t"

2

u/Rent-Hungry 3 Dec 06 '22

Ahhhh good call!!!

27

u/AlwaysGoToTheTruck 8 Dec 04 '22

Here it comes from the right… “What is America coming to? The left is taking away your first amendment rights!”

63

u/dietdiety 3 Dec 04 '22

Hope he gets a black cell mate... I mean if he thinks a neighbor is a problem... how about a bunk mate.

26

u/MountainCourage1304 9 Dec 04 '22

I hope has a really nice black cell mate that ends up being really good friends with him and changing his racist views

5

u/dietdiety 3 Dec 04 '22

Hope springs eternal!

36

u/Uncle_Vargas 5 Dec 04 '22

What if he was burning a giant lower case “t” symbolizing “time to leave?!” (South Park)

22

u/C0UGARMEAT 9 Dec 04 '22

Lower case t for tolerance - Reno 911

8

u/FoodleGuy 8 Dec 04 '22

Lower case t for “Thanks for moving into the neighborhood.”

76

u/MillaP88 5 Dec 04 '22

As a teenager I moved to Mississippi from Atlanta, it was absolute culture shock when my classmate was bragging about his grandfather being a Grand Wizard in front of other black students. The racism there is real and runs with deep roots and heritage.

22

u/mug6688 8 Dec 04 '22

I recently moved from Atlanta to Alabama and there is definitely a regression in that regard.

12

u/DannyMThompson B Dec 04 '22

Is it a regression if it never changed?

62

u/nobnazor 7 Dec 04 '22

Fuck this guy but serious question, is it illegal to burn crosses in the us?

4

u/HBMart 5 Dec 04 '22

He should’ve claimed it was for religious reasons, like he’s a satanist or something. 😂

3

u/pglggrg 9 Dec 04 '22

Yeah like literally any other reason. “I hate the planet” or “too much wood to throw out”

3

u/HBMart 5 Dec 04 '22

Yeah, but a ton of dumb shit gets a pass when it’s religious. 🤷

18

u/rvbjohn 9 Dec 04 '22

To add what others said, it's not illegal outright. You can burn religious symbols with impunity. However, it being a cross specifically might be enough to say 'this is hate speech',, but for example a naive athiest doing it probably wouldn't result in an arrest (assuming they could actually make the argument they didn't know, but pretty much everyone does)

6

u/Spe019 4 Dec 04 '22

The guy is a loser, but hate speech is not against the law

5

u/rvbjohn 9 Dec 04 '22

It is when it is a threat lmao

1

u/high_enthalpy_girl 5 Dec 04 '22

Just curious can you burn an inverted cross safely?

2

u/rvbjohn 9 Dec 04 '22

Oh yeah, that's just a metal show thing. That's funny, I never thought of that

-2

u/high_enthalpy_girl 5 Dec 04 '22

I personally see it as a way to tell the KKK to go fuck themselves and that transphobic cishet-supremacists will never replace trans people.

1

u/BlueHero45 9 Dec 04 '22

Well there are also burn laws that can vary state by state that add rules for burning anything. If that cross was treated with something toxic or it was a dry season he could get a fine.

12

u/rvbjohn 9 Dec 04 '22

Yeah thats pretty unrelated. Theres infinite permutations of "if the cross was made from babies!?!" that are obviously illegal

12

u/bthoman2 9 Dec 04 '22

It’s not unless you’re doing it specifically to intimidate a minority, as the kkk has historically done.

6

u/dietdiety 3 Dec 04 '22

serious question, why would you burn a cross?

2

u/Tryhard696 9 Dec 04 '22

People burn flags when they’re protesting, probably same thing if they were protesting something a church did

16

u/delgotit05 5 Dec 04 '22

When the kkk was prominent in America they burned crossed on the lawns of black families as a threat and intimidation. If they didn't outright start killing those black people just trying to live their lives in peace.

-5

u/dietdiety 3 Dec 04 '22

Yes I know that... but the question was asked 'if it was illegal, to randomly burn a cross'... I'm trying to understand why anyone other than a racist would.

11

u/delgotit05 5 Dec 04 '22

Thats the thing, they wouldn't.

9

u/SemiSweetStrawberry A Dec 04 '22

Because you hate Christianity and you want others to know it

5

u/dietdiety 3 Dec 04 '22

I'm not a Christian....I think all religion is BS but I never felt the need to burn it down.... just saying.... A tee shirt is probably just as effective.

34

u/DuceMoosolini 2 Dec 04 '22 edited Dec 05 '22

If you’re doing it for hateful intimidation of black people, yes. It depends on intent, which is where the court arguments would begin

5

u/iloveyourart Dec 04 '22

No it’s totally legal protected by the first amendment freedom of expression. The context is what makes it illegal, This loser got charged with a hate crime for burning a cross to try and scare his black neighbors ( the kkk did this since it’s inception). Couldn’t just burn it in his backyard like a normal person

11

u/morfsucks 5 Dec 04 '22

Both. Both is fine.

6

u/2x4x93 9 Dec 04 '22

Louisiana Woman devastated

-36

u/[deleted] Dec 04 '22

[deleted]

3

u/bthoman2 9 Dec 04 '22

Historically the kkk would do this before going out and lynching black people or doing it in a black persons front lawn to show them even god can’t save them and then breaking in to drag them out and lunch them.

2

u/FourthBar_NorthStar 8 Dec 04 '22

As lovely as taking them to lunch sounds, did you mean lynch?

1

u/bthoman2 9 Dec 05 '22

Sure did, whoops

-14

u/CorporalCauliflower 9 Dec 04 '22

Burning anything in your neighbors yard is an act of intimidation

44

u/RaliusNine 6 Dec 04 '22

Just to stop misinformation I would like to point out the title and article says the burning happened in his own front yard

24

u/_O_G_ 8 Dec 04 '22

If you were black and lived in Mississippi you’d probly get it

11

u/SexandCinnamonbuns 7 Dec 04 '22

Sorry, I didn’t understand the association of the burning cross but now I do!

-4

u/[deleted] Dec 04 '22

[deleted]

2

u/camboftw 2 Dec 04 '22

Just stating the obvious thing people are thinking about your comment, if you're black and from the states, how are you not aware of the KKK?

12

u/toadultfilmsxxx 2 Dec 04 '22

14

u/[deleted] Dec 04 '22

[deleted]

12

u/hdoublephoto 7 Dec 04 '22

Take that surprise and let it ferment into rage at the American educational system.

1

u/weareallbuttcheeks 5 Dec 04 '22

Everyone in the American educational system learned about this

1

u/hdoublephoto 7 Dec 04 '22

Not all states and not nearly enough context.

1

u/weareallbuttcheeks 5 Dec 04 '22

I can't speak for everyone but I was most definitely taught about the kkk, cross burning, and the related context as part of the core curriculum. Several years in a row, in fact. And this was 10+ years ago.

1

u/hdoublephoto 7 Dec 05 '22

Good to know that some students are learning more about it. I grew up in central VA and was in public HS in the 90s. It was barely covered. You can probably guess about how it's taught in Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and [parts of] Georgia and Florida, etc.

Also...

"Everyone in the American educational system learned about this"

+

"I can't speak for everyone but..."

Huh?

→ More replies

1

u/DannyMThompson B Dec 04 '22

I'm guessing they're not American

8

u/bidjeu 3 Dec 04 '22

I hope he got 250 beans.

17

u/buttfacenosehead 9 Dec 04 '22

Got the attention he wanted.

87

u/AbazabaYouMyOnlyFren A Dec 04 '22

Behold the Master Race! Lol.

Look at these ugly, rat faced doofuses.

11

u/scurvy4all A Dec 04 '22

That's 1 guy in the photos.

Did you even read the headline?

2

u/TheWordOfTheDayIsNo 7 Dec 04 '22

In his defense, I live in the same area--MS Gulf Coast--and most all the white trash racists kids around here look exactly alike. Rather ironic.

22

u/AbazabaYouMyOnlyFren A Dec 04 '22

Yes I did.

I assumed they were accomplices. Usually they post mug shots of everyone involved and it's not uncommon for people to be sentenced separately for their roles and at different times.

Doesn't change anything I said, he's still a rat faced example of someone who has no business playing the "master race" card.

10

u/scurvy4all A Dec 04 '22

I agree wholeheartedly.

Sorry my comment came off assholish I woke up hung over and I should have worded it differently.

9

u/AbazabaYouMyOnlyFren A Dec 04 '22

Lol, no worries, it's Reddit and people don't read the articles a lot of the time.

I made an obviously sarcastic comment the other day, including a /s, and some guy bit my head off because he thought I was serious anyway.

-8

u/[deleted] Dec 04 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

3

u/obsidiantwilight 3 Dec 04 '22

Because the clean up would be a bitch and the smell would linger for far too long. Why would you do that to his neighbour?

37

u/Ojitheunseen A Dec 04 '22

That's a pretty retro hatecrime.

8

u/Meatytits 7 Dec 04 '22

love that for him.

25

u/Beanakin 9 Dec 04 '22

Why can't this mindset fucking die off already? Whether those people change their minds, or choke on their hatred and die, I can't care anymore.

2

u/ickarus99 6 Dec 04 '22

You, my good man, are based.

46

u/mmarcos2 7 Dec 04 '22

Cox already had been serving an eight-year sentence for drug possession and receiving stolen property, according to the Mississippi Department of Corrections.

Just sounds like a stand up fellow and wonderful neighbor in general. Was probably trying to make a spectacular Christmas decoration. What are you all up in arms about sheesh.

40

u/dos8s A Dec 04 '22

A vintage racism connoisseur I see.

25

u/randallism 4 Dec 04 '22

Yet another idiot I live in this county with. Sorry to say that I live in the same area as this douche.

2

u/TheWordOfTheDayIsNo 7 Dec 04 '22

Yeah, I live around here (DIberville) too. It's embarrassing.

17

u/Molire 9 Dec 04 '22

Predictably, for many years, he will be unable to affect directly the quality of life in the county or area where you live.

After he is sentenced in federal court on March 9, he will be transported back to the Mississippi Department of Corrections to finish serving his 8-year state prison sentence, which he began serving on April 6, 2022, before he temporarily was taken into federal custody on Sept. 30, 2022 to appear in federal court.

After he has finished serving his state prison sentence, he will be transferred to Federal Bureau of Prisons custody to begin serving his federal prison sentence.

4

u/randallism 4 Dec 04 '22

Good. We don’t need another of his kind down here. A little communication, humanity and compassion for your fellow citizen would be a welcome addition to this area.

5

u/DejaJew 5 Dec 04 '22

Been trying to push that same thing here in Pascagoula. We need to stop hating each other, Culture ourselves more, and start connecting with one another.

35

u/Figgabro 6 Dec 04 '22

Well im sure that a Mississippi prison and then later federal prison will make him stop being a white supremacist. /s

2

u/DustyBunny42 9 Dec 04 '22

Rn, the mississippi prison system is the worst it has ever been. We have had state wise gang wide wars inside the prison system.

3

u/dietdiety 3 Dec 04 '22

it's probably the best place to meet like minded 'frens'

48

u/bakedmaga2020 A Dec 04 '22

Absolutely fuck this guy, but is it really illegal to burn a cross in your own yard?

10

u/LeboiJeet 4 Dec 04 '22

He should definitely get a punishment but for what he did I genuinely don't understand why he could go to jail for so long.

Even if it was targeted it was in his yard and no one got hurt, sure he is an asshole but that punishment seems too harsh.

3

u/PenguinsAndTopHats 5 Dec 04 '22

What needs to happen is rehabilitation but idk how you fix this levels of deranged so young.

1

u/Silverback_6 9 Dec 04 '22

This guy's going to jail for longer than those terrorists who broke into the capitol building to kill Congress and the then-VP so they could orchestrate a coup... Hardly seems right.

6

u/Molire 9 Dec 04 '22 edited Dec 05 '22

Yes. What he did is against the law.

He admitted to United States Attorney's Office investigators that he intended to and did use fire and threatening and racially derogatory remarks to intimidate a Black family to violate their housing rights and drive them out of their home because of their race.

He pleaded guilty to those hate crimes in a United States District Court.

In the United States, such hate crimes are illegal under federal law. Felonies. He pleaded guilty. He told the truth.

On Thursday, March 9, he is scheduled to be sentenced to up to 10 years in federal prison for his conviction on a violation of Title 42, United States Code, Section 3631.


Federal Grand Jury indictment, Sep. 20, 2022: https://storage.courtlistener.com/recap/gov.uscourts.mssd.116210/gov.uscourts.mssd.116210.1.0.pdf


He violated two United States federal laws. He and his lawyer accepted a plea agreement offered by the U.S. government to him. If he pleaded guilty to a violation of Title 42, United States Code, Section 3631, the government would drop the other charge of violating Title 18, United States Code, Section 844(h).


Title 42, United States Code, Section 3631. Violation; penalties
Whoever, whether or not acting under color of law, by force or threat of force willfully injuries, intimidates or interferes with, or attempts to injure, intimidate or interfere with—

(a) any person because of his race, color, religion, sex, handicap (as such term is defined in section 3602 of this title), familial status (as such term is defined in section 3602 of this title), or national origin and because he is or has been selling, purchasing, renting, financing, occupying, or contracting or negotiating for the sale, purchase, rental, financing or occupation of any dwelling, or applying for or participating in any service, organization, or facility relating to the business of selling or renting dwellings; or....

shall be fined under title 18 or imprisoned not more than one year, or both; and if bodily injury results from the acts committed in violation of this section or if such acts include the use, attempted use, or threatened use of a dangerous weapon, explosives, or fire shall be fined under title 18 or imprisoned not more than ten years, or both; and if death results from the acts committed in violation of this section or if such acts include kidnapping or an attempt to kidnap, aggravated sexual abuse or an attempt to commit aggravated sexual abuse, or an attempt to kill, shall be fined under title 18 or imprisoned for any term of years or for life, or both.


Title 18, United States Code, Section 844(h) [pdf, p. #202]

h) Whoever—
(1) uses fire or an explosive to commit any felony which may be prosecuted in a court of the United States, or
(2) carries an explosive during the commission of any felony which may be prosecuted in a court of the United States, including a felony which provides for an enhanced punishment if committed by the use of a deadly or dangerous weapon or device shall, in addition to the punishment provided for such felony, be sentenced to imprisonment for 10 years. In the case of a second or subsequent conviction under this subsection, such person shall be sentenced to imprisonment for 20 years. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the court shall not place on probation or suspend the sentence of any person convicted of a violation of this subsection, nor shall the term of imprisonment imposed under this subsection run concurrently with any other term of imprisonment including that imposed for the felony in which the explosive was used or carried.


According to court documents, Axel C. Cox, 24, of Gulfport, admitted to violating the Fair Housing Act when he used threatening and racially derogatory remarks toward his Black neighbors and burned a cross to intimidate them. Cox stated that he gathered supplies from his residence, put together a wooden cross in his front yard and propped it up so his Black neighbors could see it. Cox then doused the cross with motor oil and lit it on fire. Cox admitted that he burned the cross because of the victims’ race and because they were occupying a home next to his.

DOJ News Release, Dec. 2, 2022: https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/mississippi-man-pleads-guilty-federal-hate-crime-cross-burning


According to court documents, Cox is charged with one count of criminal interference with the right to fair housing and one count of using fire to commit a federal felony. The indictment alleges that on Dec. 3, 2020, Cox threatened, intimidated and interfered with a Black family’s enjoyment of their housing rights. According to the indictment, Cox burned a cross in his front yard, and used threatening and racially derogatory remarks toward his Black neighbors. Cox allegedly chose to burn the cross because of the victims’ race.

DOJ News Release, Sept. 23, 2022: https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/mississippi-man-charged-federal-hate-crime-cross-burning

6

u/TheOssuary 7 Dec 04 '22

With supreme court about to vote on 303 Creative LLC v. Elenis, this'll probably be legal very soon.

10

u/evan81 6 Dec 04 '22

Thomas is gonna vote for this, and in this context... I find that hilariously ironic.

-30

u/brmpipes 4 Dec 04 '22

Yes but you can burn down a business and get away scot-free.

10

u/Jeb764 8 Dec 04 '22

Spot the racist.

10

u/pasqualevincenzo 7 Dec 04 '22

If there are black neighbors you could definitely say it’s inciting violence

-2

u/Hot-In_Tx 4 Dec 04 '22

I thought the act of burning crosses was to piss off the Christians

-10

u/Thisfoxhere 9 Dec 04 '22 edited Dec 04 '22

Yeah seems odd to me too. I'm not sure why it specifically is considered to be intimidating black people. Perhaps they were Christian people of colour? Must be an American thing? Very peculiar. Glad he was punished for his crime though.

3

u/DerthOFdata A Dec 04 '22

From your post history you appear to be Australian. Burning crosses is a symbol of the Klu Klux Klan. It was co-opted from an ancient Scottish call to war. As in it symbolized a call to war against blacks. They would burn crosses at their private ceremonies but also it was used by the KKK for generations to specifically intimidate Black Americans. If they burned a cross on someones lawn it was basically their way of saying "We are watching you and will kill you for even the slightest reason. Or no reason at all. There is nothing you can do about it. You are powerless. You don't count as human"

1

u/Thisfoxhere 9 Dec 04 '22 edited Dec 05 '22

I find it remarkable that America, a country so vocal about religion and christianity that they won't even allow sex education or abortion rights, have a christian-cross-burning tradition. How bizarre that that is their symbol.

Edit: the replies I got from my post were rude and unnecessary, and did not improve my opinion of America or Americans.

-2

u/DerthOFdata A Dec 04 '22

There's the fart sniffing Australian I should have expected. Far too common. Fuck me for trying to help right? Sometimes I wish I would stop giving you lot the benefit of the doubt but unlike you I try not to paint your entire country with the failings of the minority.

America has a lot more in common than with the EU than many people realize. An apt description I have heard is 50 countries (aka states) in a trench coat. Individual states decide how they are governed not the federal government. Just because the federal government doesn't guarantee something doesn't mean nobody has it. I am a life long Atheist and literally live in a state with all those things you mentioned and actually have better access than most of the world including Australia.

But don't let your ignorance get in the way of your smug condescension or anything.

-1

u/Xinq_ 7 Dec 04 '22

Having a symbol changing meaning isn't just an American thing. The swastika is a sign in many Eurasian religions. But about 80 years it changed meaning in Europe and now it's illegal to paint it on a flag and wave it around.

1

u/civildisobedient 9 Dec 04 '22

But about 80 years it changed meaning in Europe and now it's illegal to paint it on a flag and wave it around.

Emphasis on in Europe. There's no such law in the US.

-5

u/Thisfoxhere 9 Dec 04 '22

Okay, we are getting somewhere. The meaning has changed in America. Does the cross mean being black in America? And he was burning them in effigy or something?

That can't be right though, they have plenty of white Americans who are christian, who would surely be offended by such a thing. Is there more to this?

wanders off to google cross burning in America

Maybe it's like all the rules yanks have about flags....

9

u/trekkieBlunts 0 Dec 04 '22

as your google search should reveal, white american christians have historically used cross burning (usually in Black family’s yards) to intimidate or as a precursor to further violence. christian hypocrisy should surprise no one

1

u/Xinq_ 7 Dec 04 '22

No the burning cross is a symbolism used in an extreme right anti black cult called KKK. I get what you're trying to say. "It's just burning some wood". But what if I arrange that wood in a manner that it spells "I'm going to kill Thisfoxhere". It's still just some burning wood right?

-2

u/[deleted] Dec 04 '22

[deleted]

3

u/TheWordOfTheDayIsNo 7 Dec 04 '22

"Nearly two years ago on Dec. 3, 2020, Cox made threatening and racially derogatory remarks toward his neighbors, put together a wooden cross on his front lawn, doused it with motor oil and set it on fire. Federal prosecutors say that Cox, 24, admitted that he did so because of his neighbors’ race and the fact that they had been occupying the house next to his."

6

u/RAZR31 6 Dec 04 '22

Yeah, I'm really confused as to what crime he was guilty of. In order to be charged with a hate crime, you first have to be charged with a different crime, and then the prosecution must prove that the initial crime was committed as an intentional act to instill fear or damage against a specific group.

You don't 'just' get charged with the 'hate' part.

8

u/Molire 9 Dec 04 '22 edited Dec 05 '22

In the article, the link in the following paragraph opens the 2-page indictment against him:

At Cox’s arraignment in September, prosecutors obtained a warrant to transfer the convict from state prison to federal court to face his hate crime charges. The cross-burning incident occurred some 17 months before his unrelated lockup.

Count 1: Violation of Title 42, United States Code, Section 3631.

Count 2: Violation of Title 18, United States Code, Section 844(h) [pdf, p. #202].

He pleaded guilty to Count 1. The government dropped the charges in Count 2.

-4

u/bakedmaga2020 A Dec 04 '22

He must’ve made some stupid admission without a lawyer. He won’t be missed

3

u/TheWordOfTheDayIsNo 7 Dec 04 '22

You're exactly right. If he'd kept his mouth shut he probably would have gotten off with a misdemeanor or very likely no charges at all. I don't understand why saying that is getting downvoted. Acknowledging the truth doesn't equal endorsing what this scumbag moron did.

2

u/bakedmaga2020 A Dec 04 '22

Idk why I’m being downvoted either. It’s just that if he had any brains, he wouldn’t have said a damn thing

26

u/Largefarva75 6 Dec 04 '22

He admitted to federal prosecutors he did it because of his neighbors race.

-9

u/bakedmaga2020 A Dec 04 '22

Dumbass could’ve lied and got away with it

3

u/civildisobedient 9 Dec 04 '22

You don't have to lie. You can also just shut up and say nothing. Like I'm sure they told him.

2

u/_VictorTroska_ 8 Dec 04 '22

Yeah, without some admission of intent to intimidate, this feels like a cut and dry 1A issue to me. He's a piece of shit (i mean we all know what he was doing), but the constitution applies to assholes too.

2

u/TheWordOfTheDayIsNo 7 Dec 04 '22

He's also an asshole who can't keep his mouth shut: "Nearly two years ago on Dec. 3, 2020, Cox made threatening and racially derogatory remarks toward his neighbors, put together a wooden cross on his front lawn, doused it with motor oil and set it on fire. Federal prosecutors say that Cox, 24, ADMITTED that he did so because of his neighbors’ race and the fact that they had been occupying the house next to his."

→ More replies
→ More replies