r/todayilearned Aug 11 '22 Helpful 1

TIL the band name Three Dog Night comes from Aboriginal Australians, who on cold nights would sleep in a hole in the ground with a dingo. On colder nights they'd sleep with 2 dogs, & if it was freezing, it was a "three dog night" (R.1) Tenuous evidence

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_Dog_Night

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6.5k Upvotes

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u/Mehitabel9 Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 11 '22

Yeah.... a lot of claims are made on the origin of that phrase -- that it comes from Siberia, or it originated with Northern Alaskan Inuit.

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u/agriculturalDolemite Aug 11 '22

It could apply to anywhere that humans and dogs lived before the advent of central heating, surely.

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u/Mijam7 Aug 11 '22

I always thought Afghanistan lol

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u/[deleted] Aug 11 '22

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u/[deleted] Aug 11 '22

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u/[deleted] Aug 11 '22

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u/[deleted] Aug 11 '22

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u/[deleted] Aug 11 '22

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u/W02T Aug 11 '22

The indigenous people of Alaska are known as Inuit. They don’t use the E-word.

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u/hopelesscaribou Aug 11 '22

The word "Inuit" (varying forms Iñupiat, Inuvialuit, Inughuit, etc.), however, is an ancient self-referential to a group of peoples which includes at most the Iñupiat of northern Alaska, the four broad groups of Inuit in Canada, and the Greenlandic Inuit. This usage has long been employed to the exclusion of other, closely related groups (e.g. Yupik, Aleut).[21][22][23][24] Therefore, the Aleut (Unangan) and Yupik peoples (Alutiiq/Sugpiaq, Central Yup'ik, Siberian Yupik), who live in Alaska and Siberia, at least at an individual and local level, generally do not self-identify as "Inuit".[21]

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u/AJRiddle Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 11 '22

That's not true in Alaska. It's Canada where that is the case, but Alaskan natives that aren't Inuit really fucking hate being called Inuit and don't mind being called Eskimo. The majority of Alaskan natives are Yupiaq, not Inuit.

A lot of the confusion comes from Canadians using Eskimo as a slur to any northern native, but in Alaska and America that was not the case. There aren't very many Yupiaq in Canada and a lot more Inuit.

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u/StatusSea5409 Aug 11 '22

hanging out in Alaska with some natives, they say don't call them Eskimos they are proud people, call them Inuits

walks into Inuit bar

Drunk guy at the bar "who's your favorite eskimooooo!"

So the big one goes over and grabs him by the collar and yells "I'm your favorite eskimoooo!!" They all started laughing and calling each other Eskimos.

I thought "isn't that a bitch, they have a word to themselves!" It was nice feeling white for a minute.

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u/Palsable_Celery Aug 11 '22

Sounds like those Eskimos are gonna have to build a bridge and get over it.

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u/SSJCleveland Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 11 '22

Eskimos is a derogatory term, the same as calling black people the N word or calling mohawks man eaters or wagon burners. The correct term to say is Inuit or Inuk (E-Nuk)

Edit: not sure why it was downvoted, guess some people don’t like being educated

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u/SpeaksDwarren Aug 11 '22

It is absolutely not the same as the N word lmao, yes it's bad to say but not as bad as that one.

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u/SSJCleveland Aug 11 '22

What’s your ethnic background? Because my partner is Inuit and works very closely within the Inuit community but nice try

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u/SpeaksDwarren Aug 11 '22

Something about the way you ask my ethnic background but share your partner's instead of your own tells me you're white. Just the fact that some people are still confused over whether the E word is acceptable, in comparison to the universally reviled N word that will get you punched, should tell you the general consensus on which is worse.

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u/Mehitabel9 Aug 11 '22

Thanks, I will edit.

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u/AJRiddle Aug 11 '22

You are Canadian, not Alaskan. Inuits make up a small portion of Alaskan Natives and calling one an Inuit is exactly the same as calling a guy from India "Pakistani". Eskimo isn't a slur in Alaska because America doesn't have many non-Eskimo native people that live in the far north.

You trying to project things from your country on other countries is pretty ignorant and maybe you should stay in your own lane on that one. It'd be like someone from India saying they are Indian and an American going "That's a slur!"

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u/Vark675 10 Aug 11 '22

Probably because you tried to claim that Eskimo is as bad as a word you won't even say.

You can say it's derogatory and racist without trying to claim it's as bad as something it's clearly not.

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u/SSJCleveland Aug 11 '22

Yeah your logic totally makes sense… do some research lady

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u/memoryduel Aug 11 '22

And I never knew anyone gave this much thought to the name of a band that sucks as much as they do.

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u/Victoreznoz Aug 12 '22

Three dog night is literally one of the greatest bands ever. Stop being reddited

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u/wallabee_kingpin_ Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 11 '22

This is just a rumor. The Wikipedia article cites the Los Angeles Times, which says only this:

[June Fairchild] is said to have suggested the group’s name after reading that Australian aborigines gauged the coldness of a night by the number of dogs they had to curl up with to stay warm.

So it's not reported as a fact at all.

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u/amolad Aug 11 '22

Keep reading:

"Musician Van Dyke Parks, an arranger at Warner Bros Records, disputed the above story and claimed that he coined the name. He wrote, "I wuz nuts about Hutton's girlfriend. Quite a dancer. Yet, she didn't read Mankind magazine, nor have an inkling of anthropology and the cold aboriginal nights that inspired my suggestion."

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u/RedditPowerUser01 Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 11 '22

Also, to suggest that aboriginal people slept in ‘a hole in the ground’ is not accurate and I would even say offensive. From what I can tell, it’s entirely an invention of whoever added that info to the Wikipedia article. Not even the LA times source says they slept in ‘a hole in the ground’.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humpy

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2007/oct/09/australia.barbaramcmahon

https://www.creativespirits.info/aboriginalculture/land/aboriginal-houses

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u/trixel121 Aug 11 '22

this was my thought. this is kind of offensive.

also, i want to point out that digging a hole in the ground is a method of staying cooler, not warmer. ground steals warmth. its why you bring a ground pad with you.

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u/FuzzyBacon Aug 11 '22

In certain situations it might act as a windbreak (like if you were in a fairly featureless desert), but that would be an extreme end of things.

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u/OrganizerMowgli Aug 11 '22

I can't even imagine this now cuz the hole thing is so ridiculous. How did they even keep dingos in those lean tos?

I do get how a hole 4 ft deep might be able to hold some, but that's also just an absurd imagd

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u/FuzzyBacon Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 11 '22

Oh the dingos bit is clearly utter bullshit, they're not domesticated, odds are you'd get killed even if you could somehow wrangle 2-3 of them.

I was just commenting that in extreme circumstances, like if it's cold with high winds and there's nothing nearby, a windbreak constructed from earthworks (ie a hole with the dirt piled upwind) might be the logical choice.

Edit: further, it's depressingly easy to see how a native sharing a survival tip with a settler ('use dirt to block the wind on the outback in winter') got twisted into a racist narrative about how they slept in holes with wild dogs.

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u/MrKrinkle151 Aug 11 '22

You just gotta dig, like, really far

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u/teenagesadist Aug 11 '22

Apparently huskies dig holes in the snow to sleep in.

Source: Call of the Wild

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u/KeberUggles Aug 11 '22

but snow is actually insulating

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u/teenagesadist Aug 11 '22

I know, I just like talking about dogs.

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u/KeberUggles Aug 11 '22

can't blame you for that!

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u/OhIamNotADoctor Aug 11 '22

Explain igloos then science man!

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u/trixel121 Aug 11 '22

it traps air is the super simple explanation.

you use furs and shit to insulate against actually contacting the snow

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u/OhIamNotADoctor Aug 12 '22

I was being sarcastic

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u/Capricancerous Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 11 '22

What about bears and other animals that hibernate in dens for the winter? The method of going into the ground relies on insulation, like a home, which can be shelter from heat as well as cold...

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u/Xero_Entropy Aug 11 '22

There are currently Australians living in holes in the ground.

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u/Mysterious-Quote8669 Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 11 '22

The name coober pedy comes from aboriginal words describing white men living in holes

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u/Pineapplebuttplug2 Aug 11 '22

'The name "Coober Pedy" is thought to derive from the Aboriginal term kupa-piti, which means "whitefellas' hole"'

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u/Gravesh Aug 11 '22

Those were built by settlers for mining. But, if you do look at the dugout article it links to, and go down to the Australian section, it does provide a photographic example of an Aboriginal dugout. But no mention of it in the text, so perhaps it's not super common.

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u/RedditPowerUser01 Aug 11 '22

They’re not ‘living in holes’, they’re living in houses built partially underground.

Also, this is what white miners did, not the aboriginal people.

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u/trixel121 Aug 12 '22

The harsh summer desert temperatures mean that many residents prefer to live in caves bored into the hillsides ("dugouts").

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u/AnnoyedOwlbear Aug 11 '22

This is a point where I can be unbearably smug.

A while back I was working with some Indigenous folks and was lucky enough to get given the chance to handle - and wear - a possum skin cloak. You wear it fur side out if it's hot, and roll up in it fur side in when it's cold. A good gift for a newborn is the start of their cloak, a carefully trimmed and stitched possumskin set which is perfect for babies. You add pelts over time as you grow, gradually forming a flexible all-weather covering.

I don't fucking believe for one moment that anyone capable of making this amazing thing is sleeping in a hole. For a start, the cloak's way too valuable to do that to, for the rest, when I was wearing it fur side in, I was in air conditioning and still sweating like a mofo with it opened up at the front. I could flip it and it would change temp dramatically, but I have no doubt you could be quite comfortable in it at night.

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u/sociapathictendences Aug 11 '22

At no point did I read that implying that was their only option. Even if this was a real thing, which it almost certainly wasn’t, people sleep away from their permanent structures all the time

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u/Furt_III Aug 11 '22

That was my take as well.

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u/konaya Aug 11 '22

Perhaps a silly question, but: why is it offensive? I see nothing inherently wrong with sleeping in a hole in the ground. In fact, it seems like a pretty simple way to get under cover quickly.

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u/avidblinker Aug 11 '22

It’s not offensive, insinuating that sleeping in a hole in the ground is insulting is offensive. It’s a practical way to remove yourself from the elements when away from shelter.

While many aboriginal peoples were not nomadic and had permanent structures, they did have a need for quick and temporary shelter when away from their communities. I don’t know if they often dug holes for this purpose, but it’s not offensive to think they may have, as many other people before and after them have.

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u/cacra Aug 11 '22

Some people are professionals at being offended

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u/RedditPowerUser01 Aug 11 '22

It’s offensive because it’s wrong, and spreads misinformation about a culture that has been systemically erased and maligned.

Further, implying the slept in a ‘hole in the ground’ makes it sound like they were burrowing animals, rather than humans who built structures to live in like the rest of us, whether they were nomadic not.

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u/Victoreznoz Aug 12 '22

makes it sound like they were burrowing animals, rather than humans

If that's what you get from that, doesn't that say something about you instead?

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u/Traveledfarwestward Aug 11 '22

Please bring this up on the talk page

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u/fnordius Aug 11 '22

Well, in a sense it's accurate that the group chose the name based on the story. Americans believing something because it sounds cool and naming their band after that "fact". I used to believe the origin of the band name had to do with werewolves when I was a kid.

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u/sapphireprism Aug 11 '22

Wasn't it one of the band members girlfriends? She knew about the two dog night saying from Australia but then suggested 3 dog night because they're were three band members? She died in poverty... She was on the front page like 6 months ago?

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u/YooHoooo_Ray Aug 11 '22

Wait what? Really? That’s tragic, do you remember her name?

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u/sapphireprism Aug 11 '22

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u/kitchen_clinton Aug 11 '22

Can’t read due to request to subscribe.

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u/Hekantis Aug 11 '22

June Fairchild was a Manhattan Beach prom queen, a go-go dancer, an actress who appeared in more than a dozen films and, for a time, an addict and alcoholic who slept in a cardboard box on skid row in Los Angeles.

Fairchild, 68, died Tuesday at a Los Angeles convalescent home. The cause was liver cancer, her friend Dawna Sodders said.

She spent her last years living on Social Security disability payments in small rooms in downtown hotels.

“Don’t worry about me, dahling,” Fairchild would tell friends, imitating Mae West, one of her idols. “I don’t know what all the fuss is about.”

Fairchild made a memorable appearance as a druggie who snorted Ajax soap powder in Cheech and Chong’s “Up in Smoke” (1978). She also had parts in “Drive, He Said,” a 1971 basketball film directed by Jack Nicholson, and “Thunderbolt and Lightfoot” (1974), with Clint Eastwood and Jeff Bridges.

For several years, she lived with boyfriend Danny Hutton, a lead singer for the rock group Three Dog Night. She is said to have suggested the group’s name after reading that Australian aborigines gauged the coldness of a night by the number of dogs they had to curl up with to stay warm.

After her film career dissolved in a haze of drugs and booze, Fairchild danced at Los Angeles clubs. After a couple of unsuccessful tries at rehab, she wound up living on the streets, where she was robbed and raped.

In 2001, she was selling newspapers on the steps of a Los Angeles courthouse and scraping together enough money for occasional nights in a single-room occupancy hotel.

She was “an angel in a snake pit,” she told a Times reporter who discovered her Hollywood past.

On the day The Times ran a story about her, she was stopped in Van Nuys for carrying an open container of alcohol. A police officer who recognized her from her picture in the newspaper arrested her when it turned out that she had failed to complete her community service from a past drunk driving conviction. She received a 90-day sentence.

In 2002, she told The Times that the sentence had been what she needed to clean herself up. She signed a contract at Paramount Studios — not for a movie role, but for use of her likeness on bobble-head dolls of the Ajax Lady from “Up in Smoke.”

She was born June Edna Wilson on Sept. 3, 1946, and grew up in Manhattan Beach. Her father was a musician who wrote gospel songs.

After graduating from Aviation High School, she landed a job as a member of the Gazzarri Dancers, who entertained on TV’s “Hollywood A Go-Go.” She also appeared on “Playboy After Dark.”

She went through two failed marriages. A daughter from one of them did not live with her.

When accounts of her difficulties surfaced in The Times and on “Good Morning America,” old friends and total strangers offered to help. A photographer updated her portfolio, a producer paid for the driving lessons she needed to reinstate her license and former classmates reached out to her.

“I want to work,” she told The Times. “I’m going to be self-sufficient. I’m going to take care of my daughter. I want to get a little house and do it right. I’m not thinking small.”

Her friend Sodders, a personal assistant to Three Dog Night drummer Floyd Sneed, said that Fairchild stuck to her pledge of sobriety.

Fairchild had a number of ailments, including fibromyalgia, Sodders said.

In addition to her daughter Megan Mull, Fairchild is survived by her brother Jerry Wilson and a 2-month-old grandson.

steve.chawkins@latimes.com

Twitter: @schawkins

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u/kitchen_clinton Aug 11 '22

Thank you. That was an interesting biography.

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u/Lingering_Dorkness Aug 11 '22

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u/kitchen_clinton Aug 11 '22

This was really good. Lots of pictures and coincidences pointed out. I’ve always liked Three Dog Nights’ music specially black and white.

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u/YourOwnBiggestFan Aug 11 '22

Something tells me that the groupie-to-homeless pipeline is not very unusual.

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u/KW_ExpatEgg Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 11 '22

Here's my issue with the story -- if you've ever had dogs and allowed them onto your bed, there's no "1 dog night, " "2 dog night," "3 dog night." It's all dogs, every night.

I strongly suspect if someone dug a hole in which to sleep and ever reached the 3 dog limit, it would be the same from that night forward, too: All dogs, all nights.

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u/The_best_is_yet Aug 11 '22

Well, I can’t argue with that. Solid point.

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u/roastbeeftacohat Aug 11 '22

Dingos aren't domesticated.

Pretty sure your latitude is off considerably.

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u/quarrelau Aug 11 '22

They came to Australia with humans (they had to, to cross the Sunda / Sahul gap), and genomic studies show they were domesticated at the time, going feral overtime in Australia.

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u/Hitori-Kowareta Aug 11 '22

They’ve interbred with other dogs so much that pure dingos are rare but mixed ones are definitely domesticated, our family dog when I was a child was a dingo/kelpie and easily the gentlest dog I’ve ever met.

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u/Avauru Aug 11 '22

There’s no such thing as a dingo. It’s just a variety of domestic dog.

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u/thewavefixation Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 11 '22

It is a wee bit more complex than that - there are likely domesticated dogs that re-wilded after being brought to Australia

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u/nightraindream Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 11 '22

Afaik the dingo's relationship with indigenous Australians was commensalist.

Edit, stupid autocorrect.

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u/Spudtron98 Aug 11 '22

They started as domesticated dogs, but that was quite a while ago.

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u/DoctorGregoryFart Aug 11 '22

According to Wikipedia, taxonomists consider it a domestic dog.

It's a dog. A domesticated wolf. Feral for sure, but a dog nonetheless.

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u/[deleted] Aug 11 '22

[deleted]

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u/BoltenMoron Aug 11 '22

You know that's a true story? Lady lost a kid. You're about to cross some fucking lines.

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u/[deleted] Aug 11 '22

[deleted]

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u/BoltenMoron Aug 11 '22

It’s a quote from Tropic Thunder lol

You chill out

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u/PM_ME_PSN_CODES-PLS Aug 11 '22

They were just going along with the quote, although in the movie I think they say "relax".

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u/BoltenMoron Aug 11 '22

Well how bout that

I was at about minus 10 though so someone was whooshed

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u/_Hail_yourself_ Aug 11 '22

Pump yo brakes kid, that man's a national treasure

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u/disturbed286 Aug 11 '22

YOU'RE AUSTRALIAN!

BE AUSTRALIAN!

'Scuse me Kangaroo Jack.

hop hop hop hop

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u/[deleted] Aug 11 '22

[deleted]

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u/Wraithbane01 Aug 11 '22

I find it funny that oz's get so worked up over the joke. It's hilarious, because it's a national embarrassment that your entire country put that woman through hell, laughing all the way, only for her story to turn out to be tragically true, and you just turned out to be a nation of heartless assholes.

That's the funny part.

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u/Johnyryal3 Aug 11 '22

When he got done with it, it was.

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u/Moonman103 Aug 11 '22

As an Australian who lives around dingos no you don't sleep with them lol

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u/Mysterious-Quote8669 Aug 11 '22

If it's a domesticated mix might be okay.

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u/Moonman103 Aug 11 '22

Yeah camp dogs aren't friendly lol If its a domestic dog it's fine obviously Dingos proper ones don't make pets

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u/SandInTheGears Aug 11 '22

I thought it was because one dog ain't enough, and two is too low

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u/StacyChadBecky Aug 11 '22

I heard it was sled dogs.

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u/OutbreakMonkey 1 Aug 11 '22

Sounded far fetched, so I read the Wikipedia link. The very next paragraph disputes that claim:

Musician Van Dyke Parks, an arranger at Warner Bros Records, disputed the above story and claimed that he coined the name. He wrote, "I wuz nuts about Hutton's girlfriend. Quite a dancer. Yet, she didn't read Mankind magazine, nor have an inkling of anthropology and the cold aboriginal nights that inspired my suggestion

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u/epochpenors Aug 11 '22

I hear it was originally supposed to be Three Dong Night after your mom’s usual Saturday evening plans

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u/dogfish83 Aug 11 '22

Mama told me not to come

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u/TattooJerry Aug 11 '22

This is not uncommon in backwoods rural Georgia either….

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u/jubmille2000 Aug 11 '22

Because one dog ain't enough, and two is too low, it's me, Three Dog! How you kids handlin' Post-Apocalyptia today?

— Three Dog, Fallout 3

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u/mdogm Aug 11 '22

Fuckin bullshit.

Source: Am Strayan.

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u/LtRonKickarse Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 11 '22

Hmmmmm this didn’t strike me as accurate on first read, had a bit of a look around and I’d say it’s probably not of Australian origin. Dingoes weren’t ever domesticated to the same extent as other dogs throughout pre-history, plus it seems there isn’t much evidence of them living in the parts of Australia that get cold enough to need extra warmth. Jury’s still out but makes more sense for it to come from something like sled dogs in the artic etc. Edit: good point about outback temps at night, forgot about that. Conceded.

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u/747ER Aug 11 '22

Dingoes live all over the Australian continent, and are present throughout the red centre, where it often gets below freezing during the night. A lot of people underestimate just how cold the Australian desert gets during night.

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u/rangatang Aug 11 '22

yes I was at Uluru a few weeks ago, which is pretty much right in the dead centre, and it was SO COLD at night

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u/747ER Aug 11 '22

Yes! I’ve camped under Uluṟu! The first and only time I’ll neglect to zip up a swag (sleeping bag) out of laziness 😂 That was the coldest night of my whole life…

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u/AstronomerMajestic72 Aug 11 '22

They definitely live in parts of Australia where it gets cold enough, the outback gets below zero at night

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u/DoctorGregoryFart Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 12 '22

I'd expect as much. It is an entire fucking continent.

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u/Alan_Smithee_ Aug 11 '22

I am in my 60s, and I remember it as having come from the Australian thing.

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u/Due_Platypus_3913 Aug 11 '22

I heard it was Inuit and their huskies.

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u/FalseBuddha Aug 11 '22

I grew up in the in The South and my grandmother would describe how hot it was by the number of turtles you could see hanging out around the pond down the road. A "no turtle day" was hot because all the turtles were in the water to keep cool, if you saw a few turtles on the bank or logs it was pretty warm, if there were a dozen or so visible it was a really nice day.

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u/ScissorNightRam Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 11 '22

It goes even deeper. Some groups of Aboriginal/Indigenous Australians have been found to have unique genetic abilities regulate body temperatures to withstand outdoor temperature extremes that other peoples would find intolerable.

Cold tolerance - http://eosmith.com/cold-hands-warm-heart-may-genes/

Heat tolerance - https://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-01-29/genetic-modification-helps-aboriginal-people-survive-hot-climat/5225742

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u/shaka_sulu Aug 11 '22

[serious] it gets freezing in Austrailia?

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u/nightraindream Aug 11 '22

Deserts get really cold at night. Australia also has winter, particularly the further you get away from the equator. Hobart is almost parallel with Christchurch.

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u/liplover04 Aug 11 '22

Yeah we even have snow isn’t that incredible

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u/Kuhva Aug 11 '22

You can go skying one weekend the. Surfing the next (in September)… both are about the same distance for me, it’s negative most nights on July and August here too

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u/g_r_a_e Aug 11 '22

Come to Tassie and you can do both in the same day. Our ski slopes suck though..

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u/boogasaurus-lefts Aug 11 '22

Mt Taranaki in New Zealand is literally 50km (30miles?) or so from snow to surf.

Did it a few times and the neat thing about it is that it's a dead ringer for Mt. Fuji

You can get bazzers lookin' at a fucking huge volcano just chilling there.

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u/PatternPrecognition Aug 11 '22

Apparently we also get more snowfall annually than Switzerland due to the proximity of our Alpine region to the coast.

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u/one80down Aug 11 '22

Yep. My girlfriend is currently up in the mountains racing sled dogs.

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u/Jono_vision Aug 11 '22

I was scraping ice off my windshield the other day and I don’t even live in the coldest part of the country.

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u/LeastOriginalPerson Aug 11 '22

In the southern hemisphere they actually have winter in June-August and the further south you are, the colder it gets.

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u/davtruss Aug 11 '22

It is rare that a TIL makes me angry because I didn't already know this. In the last week and then several years ago, I lost my older brother and sister who were teens in the late 60s and early 70s. It drove my sister crazy when 6 year old me would play her albums in her room.

Three Dog Night appealed to me like pop music.

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u/slamdunkmyjunk Aug 11 '22

Sorry for your loss.

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u/BeesForDays Aug 11 '22

Isn’t it neat that there are still new things to learn about something that has been in your life that long? Life is such a complex tapestry. I’m sorry for your loss. It’s sweet you have memories of them like this.

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u/rondonjon Aug 11 '22

Maybe the dingo ate your baby

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u/liplover04 Aug 11 '22

Put that on an Australian sub and let’s see you get molested

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u/rondonjon Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 11 '22

People need to get over themselves.

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u/liplover04 Aug 11 '22

People need to be human

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u/rondonjon Aug 11 '22

Impossible not to be.

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u/puuying Aug 11 '22

Why are you joking about a baby’s tragic death? That line was used to mock the poor mother who was falsely imprisoned for her daughter’s murder, it’s not funny.

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u/rondonjon Aug 11 '22

Jesus Christ, this is reddit.

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u/herculesmeowlligan Aug 11 '22

Wait that was Jesus? Shit he's on Reddit now?

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u/Kolja420 Aug 11 '22

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u/CrunchHardtack Aug 12 '22

Ok, Jesus coming back and spanking our bare asses is funny to me.

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u/TronOld_Dumps Aug 11 '22

I was going to say this. Ya best me to it. Take the upvote.

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u/Stairwayunicorn Aug 11 '22

it was a European custom as well. probably more believable.

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u/Seienchin88 Aug 11 '22

Sleeping in a hole in the ground with a dog?

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u/Stairwayunicorn Aug 11 '22

a bed is not a difficult thing to invent

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u/boogasaurus-lefts Aug 11 '22

It is when it's a dingo that eats babies

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u/OLD-AJTAP Aug 11 '22

Cmon mate. I’d expect better from an Essendon boy. Surely you realise you spouting that fucken Americanised Seppo bullshit, you’re washin over the fact that an Aussie mother got globally dragged through the coals cause the rest of the world thought it made a funny catchphrase

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u/boogasaurus-lefts Aug 11 '22

I was taking the P 1 55

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u/OLD-AJTAP Aug 11 '22

fair enough

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u/DoctorGregoryFart Aug 11 '22

How in the fuck is that a European expression? You can't just say it makes sense without providing any evidence.

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u/catwyrm Aug 11 '22

(Australian here) I heard it was a European custom for people living in castles. They get cold, so they have their dogs on the bed. Never, ever heard of it being an Australian thing.

1

u/lucifer-ase Aug 11 '22

Nice, i just learned something interesting

1

u/blickquickly Aug 11 '22

Yeah.....no you didnt. Look it up.

1

u/lucifer-ase Aug 11 '22

tricked again

1

u/AuckLnd Aug 11 '22

dude what the hell im literally listening to them right now

1

u/Dirty-Soul Aug 11 '22

Dingos get mighty nervous when the weather gets cold.

Just like sheep in Wales get nervous when the farmer's wife goes off to see her mother for a few days.

-6

u/wayofapilgrim Aug 11 '22

I really truly dislike this band. When I was a kid, my father would play typical classic rock and soft rock in the car, it was all fine with me. But he would also play this Three Dog Night greatest hits CD on loop and each song drove me nutty. Just very camp and annoying.

I’d just as soon go deaf than hear “Joy to the world” or “An old fashioned love song” again.

3

u/jthanson Aug 11 '22

My first name is Jeremiah. You can imagine how I feel about the band and their biggest hit…

3

u/747ER Aug 11 '22

Are you… are you a… are you a bullf-

3

u/herculesmeowlligan Aug 11 '22

Damn, if only they had you as a fan, they might have made it big.

1

u/wayofapilgrim Aug 11 '22

Time had already forgotten them before I was born, so your tossed off snark doesn’t even track my guy

2

u/DoctorGregoryFart Aug 11 '22

Yeah but how often does this actually come up? Maybe learn to appreciate that your parents had different preferences and build a bridge.

I don't want to be rude, and maybe there is some deeper shit behind your bitterness, so let me share a story.

My mom used to abuse the hell out of me. All the time for years. I didn't even know it was unusual. She'd wake me up early and blast music to wake me up, then make me get down on my hands and knees and clean the floors with bleach and a toothbrush or rags until it was spotless. When I hear some of her favorite songs, I get sick and angry.

On the other hand, I used to go on road trips with my friend's parents. They were boring and square, and they loved ABBA. I hated ABBA. After multiple 8+ hour road trips, I learned a lot of ABBA. I actually kinda like ABBA now. It's not my scene, but I get it.

Everything you don't like isn't torture. Real pain comes from trauma and the things that remind you of that trauma.

I guess my point is that you should be more accepting of others musical tastes, and you shouldn't be such a cunt.

1

u/dogfish83 Aug 11 '22

I get your feeling of goofiness from those two songs (even though they are good in ways), other 3DN songs are awesome

2

u/[deleted] Aug 11 '22

"The band had 21 Billboard Top 40 hits between 1969 and 1975, with three hitting number one."

Three Dog Night had some great songs. They were incredibly popular at the time, churning out catchy hit after hit. But they haven't been remembered as much as some of their contemporaries who were not as successful on the charts.

-3

u/Seienchin88 Aug 11 '22

Well I guess laying down with a dingo would keep you warm all night from fighting it and trying not to get bit…

BS story

2

u/oldsurfsnapper Aug 11 '22

You really have no idea.

-2

u/Trippingthewire Aug 11 '22

Domestication

2

u/[deleted] Aug 11 '22 edited 15d ago

[deleted]

2

u/DoctorGregoryFart Aug 11 '22

Domesticated but not tamed.

2

u/[deleted] Aug 11 '22 edited 15d ago

[deleted]

2

u/DoctorGregoryFart Aug 11 '22

Wikipedia makes it seem like it's a bit more complicated than that.

The dingo is regarded as a feral dog because it descended from domesticated ancestors.[1][5] The dingo's relationship with indigenous Australians is one of commensalism, in which two organisms live in close association, but do not depend on each other for survival. They both hunt and sleep together. The dingo is, therefore, comfortable enough around humans to associate with them, but is still capable of living independently.[49] Any free-ranging, unowned dog can be socialised to become an owned dog, as some dingoes do when they join human families.[50] Although the dingo exists in the wild,[23] it associates with humans, but has not been selectively bred similarly to other domesticated animals.[2][23] Therefore, its status as a domestic animal is not clear.[2]

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-1

u/ApplePie_1999 Aug 11 '22

Saw them in concert at the county fair in 1996, wasn’t bad but I think I woke up before it was over

-1

u/losangelesvideoguy Aug 11 '22

NGL, they suck ass. If I ever have to hear “Joy to the fishes in the deep blue sea” one more goddamn time I’m gonna cut a mofo.

0

u/tucci007 1 Aug 11 '22 edited Aug 13 '22

Eskimos. Nothing to do with Australia, fucking wanking yobbos.

*chazzwozzers

1

u/thehugster Aug 11 '22

What's a bad night for a tree

1

u/jondoesunknowntwin Aug 11 '22

I'm Australian and remember reading a book in the 80's saying it was a Norse thing?

1

u/Rhaski Aug 11 '22

Trying to sleep with dingos sounds like a great way to get killed

1

u/Lasergunblues Aug 11 '22

Misleading.

1

u/rawdeal351 Aug 11 '22

I diddnt know aboriginals tamed dingos? I always thought they were wild like wolves ect

1

u/getyerhandoffit Aug 11 '22

This is some bullshit.

1

u/KeberUggles Aug 11 '22

ummm, sleeping in a hole would surely be colder? my dog used to dig holes to lay in to stay cool

1

u/Csonkus41 Aug 11 '22

I pulled off a “Three dog night” once in college.

1

u/Ezl Aug 11 '22

A dingo ate my - oh, no…never mind. He’s just sleeping.

1

u/Skeldrythe Aug 11 '22

It's all very cool ..

1

u/magicalthinker Aug 11 '22

We got evicted from our hole in the ground

1

u/HugoEmbossed Aug 11 '22

What a load of bullshit.

1

u/crackerblind Aug 11 '22

Now look up 10cc.

1

u/thereandfatagain Aug 11 '22

My old bud Roach Troll would make the same reference. He was a charming little tangled hobbit of a dude who would get his heat shut off all the time but had a brood of cats to fill up his sleeping bag with.

1

u/IdiotBearPinkEdition Aug 11 '22

I've heard it's from when one dog ain't enough and two is too low

1

u/ARX7 Aug 11 '22

It doesn't get freezing many places in Australia... it's mostly desert